Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 108 – The Wisdom of Dr. Pepe (Chapter 1) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today we’ll start the third part of The Beauty of Basic Knowledge series, entitled The Wisdom of Dr. Pepe, in which I intend to summarise my basic approach to chest interpretation. Here I am showing radiographs of a 27-year-old man with moderate cough.

As usual, check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday to find out the solution.

Diagnosis:

1. RML disease
2. Pleural effusion
3. RLL mass
4. None of the above

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 107 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 6) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

To conclude the section “To err is human” I am presenting PA radiographs of a 57-year-old hairdresser with interstitial lung disease, who is on the waiting list for lung transplant. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 106 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 5) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

This week I’m continuing with another chapter of “To err is human”; and today I am presenting chest radiographs of a 64-year-old man. These images were taken one month after a myocardial infarction.

Check the images carefully, leave your thoughts in the comments and come back on Friday for the answer.

Diagnosis:
1. Aortic elongation
2. Aortic dissection
3. Aortic aneurysm
4. Any of the above

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 105 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 4) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Continuining with the next chapter of “To err is human”, I present PA radiograph of a 45-year-old woman with chest pain and mild fever.
How many significant findings do you see?

1. One
2. Two
3. Three
4. Four

Check the image below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Mar 2017
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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 104 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 3) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting chest radiographs taken during a routine check-up of a 60-year-old woman. Radiographs were read as normal. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 103 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 2) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting radiographs of a 30-year-old man. They were taken because an abnormal ECG was found in a routine check-up. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 102 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 1) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today we’ll start the second part of The Beauty of Basic Knowledge series, titled ‘To err is human: how to avoid slipping up’. In the next six chapters I intend to analyse the most common causes of errors in chest imaging and how to avoid them. As Cicero said: All men can err, but only the ignorant persevere in the error.

This week I am presenting two cases. Case 1 shows the PA radiograph of a 57-year-old man with a cough. Would you say the chest is normal?
1.Yes
2.No
3.Need a lateral view
4.Need a CT

Case 2 presents PA and lateral radiographs of the yearly check-up of a 70-year-old man. CT done in another institution was reported as chronic post-TB changes. Do you agree?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the full solution!

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 101 – A painless approach to interpretation (Chapter 8) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting the last chapter of the Painless Approach to Interpretation. Showing chest radiographs taken during an annual check-up of a 70-year-old man.

What do you see? Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 100 – A painless approach to interpretation (Chapter 7) – SOLVED!

diploma_casebook_case100

Dear Friends,

Today I present the seventh chapter of the Painless Approach to Interpretation, which also happens to be case number 100 of Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook. It makes me very proud to have shared with you one hundred cases and hope they have been useful.

Showing chest radiographs of a 47-year-old woman with mild fever and chest pain.

What do you see? Check the images below, leave me your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 99 – A painless approach to interpretation (Chapter 6) – SOLVED!

diploma_casebook_case99

Dear Friends,

We’re moving on to a new chapter of the Painless Approach to Interpretation, and this week I’m showing the routine control radiographs of a 48-year-old woman, surgically treated for carcinoma of the breast ten years ago.
What do you see?

Check the image below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back for the answer on Friday.

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