Caceres’s Corner Case 61 (Update: Solution)

ESR_2012_Blog-CaceresCorner-590-CASE61

Dear Friends,

Today we’re presenting a routine chest control of a 53-year-old woman who had a lumpectomy for carcinoma of the breast three years ago. Radiographs were read as normal. Do you agree? Any ideas?

Read more…

03
Apr 2013
POSTED BY
POSTED IN Caceres' Corner
DISCUSSION 24 Comments

Caceres’s Corner Case 60 (Update: Solution)

ESR_2012_Blog-CaceresCorner-590-CASE560

Dear Friends,

Today, we’re showing you radiographs of a 29-year-old non-European male with moderate dysphagia. Questions:

1. Where is the lesion?
2. What would be your diagnosis?

Read more…

27
Mar 2013
POSTED BY
POSTED IN Caceres' Corner
DISCUSSION 16 Comments

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 27 – SOLVED

Diploma_casebook_case27

Dear Friends,

This week we have the case of a 45-year-old man, who is an alcoholic with abdominal pain, jaundice, and weight loss.

Possible diagnoses:

1. Duodenal neoplasm
2. Focal pancreatitis of pancreatic head
3. Pancreatic neoplasm
4. None of the above

Read more…

Caceres’s Corner Case 59 (Update: Solution)

ESR_2012_Blog-CaceresCorner-590-CASE59

Dear Friends,

Muppet insists on presenting another case of inspiration/expiration films to test your knowledge. Showing radiographs of a 29-year-old asymptomatic female. What do you think is happening?

29 y.o.  asymptomatic female

29 y.o. asymptomatic female

Click here for the answer to case #59

20
Mar 2013
POSTED BY
POSTED IN Caceres' Corner
DISCUSSION 21 Comments

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 26 – SOLVED

Diploma_casebook_case26

Dear Friends,

Today I’m showing a case of a 63-year-old man with left heart dysfunction and angor.

one

Read more…

Caceres’s Corner Case 58 (Update: Solution)

ESR_2012_Blog-CaceresCorner-590-CASE58

Dear Friends,

While I was in Vienna, Muppet prepared the following case for you: 21-year-old girl with marked dyspnea, no fever. What do you think it’s happening?

Inspiration - 21-year-old girl with marked dyspnea, no fever.

Inspiration – 21-year-old girl with marked dyspnea, no fever.

Read more…

13
Mar 2013
POSTED BY
POSTED IN Caceres' Corner
DISCUSSION 17 Comments

Next year’s ECR set to be Russian Affair

ECR2013_ECRToday_monday_ECR2014

ECR Today spoke with the next ECR president, Prof. Valentin Sinitsyn. He is chief of the radiology department at the Federal Centre of Medicine and Rehabilitation in Moscow, Russia, and currently serves as president of the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR).

ECRT: What will be the main highlights of ECR 2014′s scientific programme?

Valentin Sinitsyn: Prepare for more interactivity. People are increasingly interested in interactive sessions to assess what they have learned from a lecture. The ECR has been developing interactive sessions for several years now, but we want to increase that. Today, you can find a lot of information on the internet and many people might not think it is necessary to travel to a congress. We want to create something attractive and show that it is worth coming here. Nothing can replace shaking hands with your colleagues from other countries. I would be very sad if the ECR were entirely online. This is why we are making live meetings more interactive.

ECR 2014 Congress President Valentin Sinitsyn, from Moscow, Russia.

ECR 2014 Congress President Valentin Sinitsyn, from Moscow, Russia.

We would also like to change the format of scientific sessions. Our lectures have the same format they had one or two hundred years ago: a stage and an auditorium. We are currently discussing the concept of a multimedia classroom, a model which was successfully introduced during the last SIRM congress in June 2012. This multimedia classroom offered 60 work stations from different companies with 25 different cases which were discussed at the end. We are currently discussing the structure with Professor E. Neri from Pisa, who was responsible for the scientific programme of that project.

Soon we are going to use smart phones for voting during audience response sessions. But wireless technology has its limits and sometimes networks crash, so it needs a lot of work. Keypads are an old technology but they are very reliable. I am sure that next year, or the year after that, everybody will be able to vote with their own iPads or tablets.

We will also increase the number of multidisciplinary sessions. This is not something we have to do just during the ECR. This year we had the Imaging Biomarker’s Course the day before the congress, which was organised by the European School of Radiology. This will take place again next year with radiation oncology as the topic.

Read more…

Rise of mobile technology brings risks as well as benefits

ECR2013_ECRToday_Monday_mobiletechnology

Watch this session on ECR Live: Monday, March 11, 16:00–17:30, Room F1
Tweet #ECR2013F1 #SF19

Tablet computers can be a surprisingly divisive subject. The passion with which some people argue the relative merits of competing devices and operating systems can be almost frightening. In the field of medicine, however, there appears to be very little argument about the top product, with professionals from many disciplines enthusiastically embracing the iPad as a tool for research, education and general communication. Instead the most important debate is focused elsewhere, on matters of data security and patient privacy.

As mobile technology spreads throughout the hospital, data naturally follows, and it is slowly falling into the hands of an increasingly broad spectrum of people. Radi-ologists and clinicians therefore need to be aware, not just of the many mobile applications and resources that can potentially aid their work, but of the associated risks and best practices concerning the use of tablet technology.

Dr. Erik Ranschaert (left – pictured here with Dr. Jan Schillebeeckx) from ‘s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands, will speak on mobile telera-diology with tablet computers in this Special Focus Session

Dr. Erik Ranschaert (left – pictured here with Dr. Jan Schillebeeckx) from ‘s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands, will speak on mobile telera-diology with tablet computers in this Special Focus Session

Read more…

ESR set to tackle personalised medicine and face economic realities in 2013

ECR2013_ECRToday_Monday_realities2013

In an interview with ECR Today, incoming ESR President, Professor Guy Frija explained how the ESR should address the challenges raised by the explosion of ‘omics’ data and the advent of personalised medicine, as well as how it should assess the impact of the financial crisis on the specialty.

ECR Today: What are your plans and ambitions regarding your presidency?
Guy Frija: The development of the ESR since its establishment in 2005 has been amazing: the ESR is now the biggest radiological society in the world, and its annual meeting, the European Congress of Radiology (ECR), is one of the best radiology congresses worldwide. All of this is the result of intense activity in several fields, such as education, research, professional challenges and publications, for the development of which the role of my predecessors was instrumental, along with the dedication of many of our colleagues. Therefore my first goal is to keep up this momentum and run the society appropriately, in accordance with its new statutes. However, life is challenging, and we will have to face many new issues in the coming year.

Professor Guy Frija is head of the imaging department at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital (Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, H.E.G.P.) in Paris.

Professor Guy Frija is head of the imaging department at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital (Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, H.E.G.P.) in Paris.

The explosion of ‘omics’ (such as metabolomics, proteomics, genomics) data is changing the face of medicine so considerably and rapidly that, if we don’t pay enough attention, our specialty could be threatened. Personalised medicine is not a just a dream, but an actual reality, and we have to adapt our specialty to this new paradigm. This year, DNA sequencing could become available for less than €750 (US$1,000), and in the UK, the Prime Minister David Cameron has launched a programme for the development of personalised medicine. The development of personalised imaging, which has already begun in oncology, should be taken further, and we have to appreciate its impact on education. I will ask two or three subspecialties to reconsider their training charters in light of these new developments. The data explosion related to these changes raises not only the problem of their management, but also of their interpretation in an integrated way: the imaging parameters should be included in this new data knowledge organisation, where knowledge modelling will become a major challenge. The establishment of imaging biobanks should be promoted along with adapted data privacy regulation.

Read more…

Imaging plays major role in fight against head and neck cancers

ECR2013_ECRToday_Monday_headneckcancer

Watch this session on ECR Live: Monday, March 11, 08:30–10:00, Room N/O
Tweet #ECR2013NO #SF16B

Organ-sparing surgery and radiation treatment such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) – often combined with chemotherapy – have increased the need for advanced imaging in the head and neck during pre-treament and post-treatment stages. Precision is vital as any tumour that remains undetected outside the treatment field could adversely affect the patients’ prognosis and survival, according to Professor Vincent Vandecaveye, from the department of radiology at the University Hospitals Leuven in Belgium.

It is important to spot any tumour recurrence as early as possible, especially in the post-treatment phase, in order give the patient the best possible chance of salvage treatment. The most common imaging methods in the head and neck area remain CT, MRI and PET-CT; each comes with its own advantages and disadvantages.

Multiparametric MRI for early treatment prediction of chemoradiation in oropharyngeal cancer:  Upper row is pre-treatment MRI of right base of tongue cancer (a=contrast enhanced T1 as anatomical correlate; b=native b1000 diffusion-weighted image; c= ADC-map; d=perfusion-map of IUAC). Middle row is 2 weeks during chemoradiation: same imaging sets, tumour volume will not help. No significant change in b1000, ADC nor perfusion-MRI indicate non-response and thus high risk of tumour relapse after end of treatment.  Tumour relapse at PET-CT 8 months after end of treatment, proven by histology (k). (Provided by Professor Vincent Vandecaveye)

Multiparametric MRI for early treatment prediction of chemoradiation in oropharyngeal cancer: Upper row is pre-treatment MRI of right base of tongue cancer (a=contrast enhanced T1 as anatomical correlate; b=native b1000 diffusion-weighted image; c= ADC-map; d=perfusion-map of IUAC). Middle row is 2 weeks during chemoradiation: same imaging sets, tumour volume will not help. No significant change in b1000, ADC nor perfusion-MRI indicate non-response and thus high risk of tumour relapse after end of treatment. Tumour relapse at PET-CT 8 months after end of treatment, proven by histology (k). (Provided by Professor Vincent Vandecaveye)

Read more…

10
Mar 2013
POSTED BY
POSTED IN ECR 2013 ECR Today
DISCUSSION 1 Comment