East meets west at ECR 2015

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With its slogan ‘radiology without borders’ ECR 2015 embodies the spirit of European cooperation: bringing together imaging experts from all around the world to exchange and discuss the latest trends in their discipline. One of the best examples of ECR’s commitment to international collaboration is the ‘ESR meets’ programme, which invites three national radiological societies to present facts about imaging in their country, and a partner discipline to focus on its cooperation with radiology.

Germany, home to ECR President Prof. Bernd Hamm from Berlin, will kick off the programme on Friday with a session organised by the German Radiological Society (DRG) and entitled ‘Tradition goes digital: getting ready for the future’.

“This session will deal with changes facing radiologists as their world becomes digital; this does not refer to digital imaging modalities but rather to aspects of new options for radiologist training, population-based imaging and hybrid imaging techniques,” Prof. Hamm said.

“Today, in many areas of life, digitisation is the most important trend. Radiology, due to its everyday use of technology, is at the forefront of medical specialties in this respect. Digitisation, as we all know, needs a conscious effort on the part of the user: as radiologists, we do not want to be led but to lead. So we should stop a moment and think how digitisation impacts our profession. Some examples will be given in the session,” said DRG President Prof. Norbert Hosten from Greifswald, who will co-moderate the session.

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 64 – SOLVED!

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Dear Friends,

Showing today pre-op radiographs for knee surgery of a 17-year-old girl. Check the images below, leave your diagnosis in the comments section and come back on Friday for answer.

Diagnosis:

1. Branchial cyst
2. Neurogenic tumour
3. Lymphocele
4. None of the above

Read more…

03
Nov 2014
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The Patient’s view on brain imaging: Austrian Stroke Self-Help Association

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The ESR spoke with Manuela Messmer-Wullen, president of the Austrian Stroke Self-Help Association (SHÖ) and liaison officer for the Stroke Alliance for Europe (SAFE), about the long-term effects of stroke, how it can be prevented and how imaging can help provide a crucial time-saving diagnosis.

ESR: What is the overall aim of your organisation in Austria and what exactly do you do to achieve this goal?

Manuela Messmer-Wullen: Our mission is to inform the public about the burden of stroke, inform them on how to prevent stroke and support those who have been affected by stroke with information regarding their rehabilitation. We also provide support for carers, as well as information on where to find the right rehabilitation facilities, medical support, access to treatments, etc. We lobby, in general, for a better situation for stroke patients and their carers, to give them all a voice in the Austrian healthcare system. I do this work on a voluntary basis, without financial support from the state; projects are financed by individual funders. My personal investment of knowledge, time, energy and power is made in an effort to give stroke patients and their carers a better quality of life in Austria.

ESR: How many members do you have? Who are they?

MMW: In several Austrian states there are different groups run by individuals, therapeutic staff and medical professionals. SHÖ is the umbrella organisation for stroke patients and its membership is made up from many different patient groups who support their members across the country and within different fields.

Manuela Messmer-Wullen, president of the Austrian Stroke Self-Help Association (SHÖ) and liaison officer for the Stroke Alliance for Europe (SAFE)

ESR: Stroke affects an increasing number of people worldwide. Do you think current Austrian health policies are well suited to tackling the issue?

MMW: Not at all, there is no special information pointing out that stroke itself is a brain attack. Stroke is often obscured by the term ‘cardiovascular disease’. This term is used by the media for simplicity and much of the public is unaware that it includes stroke. It would be more helpful to use the individual terms, stroke and heart attack more often. The public has to be informed about the danger of stroke and its possible consequences, like disability. Stroke affects the brain and can damage a lot of functions. Most people have no idea about these facts. Once they have this basic information about stroke, we can start educating them on how to prevent it. Stroke is the only brain disease that can, in certain circumstances, be prevented. People need to be informed of the necessary lifestyle changes.

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ECR on Demand Preview: Thoracic emergencies #E³ 1520 #A-485

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E³ 1520 – Thoracic emergencies, A-458 B – Pulmonary

A short preview of lecture A-458 ‘B. Pulmonary’, from the session E³ 1520 ‘Thoracic emergencies’ at ECR 2014, given by C.M. Schaefer-Prokop from Amersfoort, Netherlands. Watch the whole lecture and many more at http://ipp.myESR.org Direct link: http://bit.ly/Thoracic_emergencies

Sunday, March 9, 16:00 – 17:30 / Room A

Abstract: Acute respiratory failure can have multiple underlying causes including infection, fluid overload, immunological diseases or exacerbation of preexisting lung disease. Since the clinical symptoms are nonspecific, imaging plays an important role. The first imaging method is mostly the chest radiograph, easy to access and to obtain, but non-diagnostic in many cases. (HR)CT offers more possibilities to define the differential diagnosis. The option of this interactive workshop will be to get familiar with the spectrum of diseases that can cause acute respiratory failure and learn about key findings in radiography as well as CT to reduce the differential diagnosis. The interaction between preexisting lung disease, clinical information (e.g. chemotherapy, rheumatoid arthritis, COPD) and imaging findings will be discussed using clinical case studies. Options and also limitations of imaging findings will be illustrated. The following scenarios will be taken into account: acute cardiac failure and various appearances of oedema; acute immunological-toxic disorders including drug-induced lung disease and inhalational injuries; exacerbations of preexisting lung disease including fibrotic and obstructive lung disorders; severe infections causing respiratory failure and their complications.

28
Oct 2014
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Caceres’ Corner Case 101 (Update: Solution)

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Dear Friends,

Muppet is feeling very guilty about the difficulty of case 100. To regain your sympathy, he has selected an easy case: radiographs belong to a 53-year-old woman with moderate pain in the right hemithorax for the last six months. Where is the lesion?

1. Lung
2. Mediastinum
3. Pleura/chest wall
4. Can’t tell

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments sectiona and come back on Friday for the answer.

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27
Oct 2014
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ECR On Demand Preview: The human connectome #NH 7 #A-158

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NH 7 – The human connectome, A-158 – Connectomics in brain pathology (M.P. v.d. Heuvel)

A short preview of lecture A-158 ‘Connectomics in brain pathology’, from the session NH 7 ‘The human connectome: a comprehensive map of brain connections’ at ECR 2014, given by M.P. van den Heuvel from Utrecht, Netherlands.

Watch the whole lecture and many more at http://ipp.myESR.org
Direct link: http://bit.ly/The_human_connectome

Friday, March 7, 16:00 – 17:30 / Room Board Room B

Abstract:

Healthy brain function depends on efficient functional communication within a complex network of structural neural connections, a network known as the connectome. Conversely, damage to the brain’s network, disrupting local neuronal processes and/or global communication between remote functional systems may lead to brain dysfunction. In the last few years, emerging evidence from a wide variety of studies suggests that connectome abnormalities may indeed play an important role in the aetiology of several brain disorders. In my talk, I will discuss the results of recent studies suggesting an important role for affected connectome organization in a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. In particular, I will highlight the findings of affected functional and structural brain network in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and ALS, as well as discuss how the application of network science and connectomics may aid our understanding of the biological basis of psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

25
Oct 2014
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The patient’s view on brain imaging: European Federation of Neurological Associations

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The ESR spoke with Donna Walsh, executive director of the European Federation of Neurological Associations (EFNA) about how her organisation supports patients with brain disorders and how well patients are informed about the role of radiology in neurology.

European Society of Radiology: What is the overall aim of your organisation and what exactly do you do to achieve this goal?

Donna Walsh: The European Federation of Neurological Associations (EFNA) is an umbrella group representing pan-European neurology patient groups. Our slogan, ‘empowering patient neurology groups,’ encapsulates our goals as an association. We strive to add capacity to our members, allowing them to be the most effective advocates possible in their own disease-specific areas. EFNA embraces the concept of partnership for progress: working at a high level with relevant stakeholders from the fields of policy, medical, scientific/research, industry, patient partners and other key opinion leaders.

Donna Walsh, executive director of the European Federation of Neurological Associations

Donna Walsh, executive director of the European Federation of Neurological Associations

ESR: How many patient organisations do you represent? How many members do you have? Who are they?

DW: EFNA is an umbrella organisation comprising 19 predominantly pan-European disease-specific neurology patient organisations. These are Dystonia Europe, Euro-Ataxia, European Alliance for Restless Legs Syndrome (EARLS), European Alliance of Neuromuscular Disorders Associations (EAMDA), European Headache Alliance (EHA), European Huntington’s Federation (EHF), European Multiple Sclerosis Platform (EMSP), European Myasthenia Gravis Association (EuMGA), European Network for Research in Alternating Hemiplegia in Childhood (ENRAH), European Polio Union, European Sexual Health Alliance (ESHA), Guillain-Barre & Associated Inflammatory Neuropathies (GAIN), International Brain Tumour Alliance (IBTA), International Bureau for Epilepsy (IBE), Motor Neurone Disease Association (MND) – Europe, Pain Alliance Europe (PAE), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Association – Europe (PSP-Europe), Stroke Alliance for Europe (SAFE) , Trigeminal Neuralgia Association UK. As you can see, there are also some national organisations who are associate members and some international groups, in the absence of a pan-European association.

ESR: What are the most common brain diseases in Europe?

DW: Brain disorders are very common and will affect one in three of us during our lifetime. They range from very prevalent disorders such as migraine (affecting up to 15% of the population) to very rare disorders. Most people will have heard of multiple sclerosis, dementia, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, stroke, etc. But people often forget that sleep, mood, anxiety, addiction and eating disorders are also disorders of the brain. So brain disorders range from the genetic to the degenerative to the muscular and beyond!

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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 63 – SOLVED!

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Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting the case of a 43-year-old man with lymphoma, admitted with fever and left pleural effusion. Radiographs were taken after pleural fluid drainage. Check the images below, leave me your diagnosis in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

Diagnosis:
1. Pneumonia
2. LLL collapse
3. Pleural fluid
4. None of the above

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Caceres’ Corner Case 100 (Update: Solution)

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Dear Friends,

Muppet and I are very happy to have reached one hundred cases. We hope you enjoyed them as much as we did. Radiographs of this case belong to a 52-year-old man with vague chest complaints. He was operated on for testicular tumour fifteen years earlier.

Check the images below, leave your thoughts and diagnosis in the comments section, and come back on Friday to find out the answer.

Diagnosis:

1. Duplication cyst
2. Lymphangioma
3. Metastasis from testicular tumour
4. None of the above

Read more…

13
Oct 2014
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ECR on Demand Preview: The hand and wrist #RC 1910 #A-585

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RC 1910 – The hand and wrist, A-585 C- Tumours and tumour-like lesions

A short preview of lecture A-585 ‘C. Tumours and tumour-like lesions’, from the session RC 1910 ‘The hand and wrist’ at ECR 2014, given by E. Llopis from Valencia, Spain.

Watch the whole lecture and many more at http://ipp.myESR.org

Direct link: http://bit.ly/The_hand_and_wrist

Monday, March 10, 16:00 – 17:30 / Room E1

Abstract:

Radiological study of the wrist and hand is challenging due to its complex anatomy with many small structures and the number of normal bone and soft tissue variants that might mimic injuries. Moreover, many findings can be asymptomatic. Their knowledge is important to avoid misdiagnosis. During this lecture we will also review the role of the different imaging modalities, such as plain films for wrist alignment and bone structures as well as the important role of US and MR in differentiating tumour from tumour-like conditions. We will become familiar with some specific radiological findings that allow us to make accurate diagnoses of soft tissue and bone lesions.

11
Oct 2014
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