Eminent neuroradiologist to give honorary lecture at ECR 2017

Watch this session on ECR Live: Thursday, March 2, 12:15–12:45, Room A
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In recognition of his significant impact on the field of neuroimaging and his service to organised radiology, Professor Mauricio Castillo from Chapel Hill, NC, United States, has been invited to deliver the Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Honorary Lecture ‘Dissatisfaction, burnout and inequality: three major challenges in radiology’ at ECR 2017.

Professor Mauricio Castillo from Chapel Hill, United States

Professor Mauricio Castillo from Chapel Hill, United States, will deliver the Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Honorary Lecture today at 12:15 in Room A.

Mauricio Castillo is the James H. Scatliff distinguished professor of radiology, chief and programme director of neuroradiology at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He is currently president of the American Roentgen Ray Society.

Originally from Guatemala, Prof. Castillo completed his radiology and neuroradiology training at the University of Miami School of Medicine, Jackson Memorial Medical Center, and Emory University School of Medicine, Affiliated Hospitals in Atlanta respectively.

His specialty and subspecialty choice was in large part motivated by his mentors.

“When I was a medical student, I was fortunate to work in the only teaching hospital that had a CT scanner and two board-certified radiologists. I was very impressed by the impact of imaging in patient care and by the way these two professionals used their large base of knowledge of medicine to generate a differential diagnosis based on imaging findings. Later on, while I was a resident, I developed a close relationship with Dr. Robert Quencer, which led me to become a neuroradiologist. One should never underestimate the influence we may have on our trainees and the influence our mentors have had on us,” he said.

Prof. Castillo’s research interests include paediatric neuroimaging, application of new imaging techniques and medical literature editing. Read more…

Image-guided interventions: a key pillar in cancer care

Watch this session on ECR Live: Wednesday, March 1, 16:00–17:30, Room F2
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 There is hardly any area of hospital medicine where interventional radiology (IR) has not had some impact on patient management. The range of conditions that can be treated using interventional radiology techniques is continually expanding.

In today’s session, experts will provide an insight into image-guided interventions in oncology with a particular focus on illustrating the importance of quality assurance in image-guided oncological interventions and their effect on treatment outcomes.

In recent years, IR has played a vital role in the field of oncology, and alongside medical, surgical and radiation oncology it constitutes a key pillar in cancer care. Vascular and non-vascular procedures such as transarterial chemoembolisation, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation, radioembolisation, cryoablation and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) are delivered locally, minimise damage to nearby tissue and avoid the systemic side effects of chemotherapy.

Colorectal lung metastasis before CT – guided microwave ablation.

For the interventional radiologist providing oncologic therapies it is essential to understand the rapidly changing field of oncology and to have a broad knowledge of oncologic diseases and available therapies to treat them. Radiologists providing image-guided interventions in oncology have an outstanding understanding of imaging as well as a diversity of interventional skills. However, they lack formal training in oncology and an understanding of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to Prof. Andy Adam from the Department of Radiology at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital in London. Read more…

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 104 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 3) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting chest radiographs taken during a routine check-up of a 60-year-old woman. Radiographs were read as normal. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

Read more…

Prominent Brazilian radiologist to shed light on Zika virus imaging at ECR 2017

In recognition of her major achievements in neuroimaging and advancement of the field, Professor Maria de Fátima Viana Vasco Aragão from Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, will present the Guest Lecture ‘Breaking News from Latin America: How to recognise Zika virus infections on imaging studies’ at ECR 2017.

Maria de Fátima Viana Vasco Aragão is professor of radiology at the Maurício de Nassau University and Scientific Director of the Multimagem Diagnostic Centre in Recife, Brazil. She is also financial director of the Diagnostika Endoscopy and Radiology Clinic in Recife.

Prof. Vasco Aragão received her medical degree from Pernambuco Federal University in 1987 and completed her residency in radiology at Ribeirão Preto Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo. She did fellowships in CT and MRI and in neuroradiology at the Med Imagem Beneficencia Portuguesa, São Paulo, and later completed a research fellowship at Mount Sinai Hospital Center in New York, US.

She always knew she would become a doctor and chose radiology because she recognised early on the field’s value in diagnosis and treatment.

Maria de Fátima Viana Vasco Aragão is professor of radiology at the Maurício de Nassau University and Scientific Director of the Multimagem Diagnostic Centre in Recife, Brazil.

Maria de Fátima Viana Vasco Aragão is professor of radiology at the Maurício de Nassau University and Scientific Director of the Multimagem Diagnostic Centre in Recife, Brazil.

“My mother is a retired biologist and biology teacher. I have never forgotten the moment she taught me what a cell was. In my family, educators predominated and my great aunt was the first woman in Pernambuco, my home state, to graduate from medical school, in 1935. Perhaps on account of this family background I made up my mind to become a doctor. As an intern student of medicine, I was very impressed when I took my patients to be examined by CT and US. Even though there was only one CT scanner in my city, I succeeded in having all my intern patients examined, when indicated. My tutors were impressed by the swiftness with which cases were resolved. Thus I learned that radiology not only helps to quickly define diagnosis in most patients, but also provides a clear prognosis for the most adequate treatment. At the end of the course I began considering the possibility of specialising in radiology, even though 29 years ago, for most people, a radiologist was not a doctor. Shortly after graduation, I sat for a test and won a place in radiology at the first attempt, and radiology has been my passion ever since. I would like to say that I am grateful for having had great mentors, including the neuroradiologist Dr. Sérgio Santos Lima, who was my director during my fellowship in the Med Imagem Beneficencia Portuguesa, and the head and neck radiologist, Dr. Peter Som, who was one of my directors during my research fellowship at Mount Sinai Hospital Center New York,” she said.

Read more…

ESR and Materialise unveil Medical 3D Printing Experience Center together at annual meeting

3D technology has been transforming the face of healthcare for over 20 years. 3D-printed anatomical models are increasingly being used for evaluating treatment approaches, planning complex procedures and improving the training of medical professionals. And that’s just the start.

The ECR presents a great opportunity to explore the contributions and benefits that Medical 3D Printing brings to healthcare at the 3D Printing Experience Center in the Entrance Hall. To bring this experience to life, the ESR is collaborating with Materialise, as the backbone of the 3D printing industry.

3D-printed skull

You will experience the workflow interactively – from medical images to accurate 3D anatomical model, explore all the different clinical applications of Medical 3D Printing and learn the first steps of setting up a 3D lab in your hospital.

But why exactly is Medical 3D Printing generating so much interest amongst radiologists?

Read more…

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Feb 2017
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Caceres’ Corner Case 154 (Update: Solution)

Dear Friends,

Today I present images of an 89-year-old man with COPD and occasional pulmonary infections. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

Read more…

20
Feb 2017
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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 103 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 2) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting radiographs of a 30-year-old man. They were taken because an abnormal ECG was found in a routine check-up. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

Read more…

Caceres’ Corner Case 153 (Update: Solution)

Dear Friends,

This week we are showing a relaxing case. Images belong to a 64-year-old man with a cough and fever. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

Read more…

06
Feb 2017
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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 102 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 1) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today we’ll start the second part of The Beauty of Basic Knowledge series, titled ‘To err is human: how to avoid slipping up’. In the next six chapters I intend to analyse the most common causes of errors in chest imaging and how to avoid them. As Cicero said: All men can err, but only the ignorant persevere in the error.

This week I am presenting two cases. Case 1 shows the PA radiograph of a 57-year-old man with a cough. Would you say the chest is normal?
1.Yes
2.No
3.Need a lateral view
4.Need a CT

Case 2 presents PA and lateral radiographs of the yearly check-up of a 70-year-old man. CT done in another institution was reported as chronic post-TB changes. Do you agree?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the full solution!

Read more…

Caceres’ Corner Case 152 (Update: Solution)

Dear Friends,

Today we are showing chest radiographs of a 75-year-old man with a cough and haemoptysis.

What do you see? Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

Read more…

23
Jan 2017
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