Radiologists must be thorough when investigating malignant primary bone tumours

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Watch this session on ECR Live: Thursday, 16:00–17:30, Room E2
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Malignant primary bone tumours like osteosarcoma and Ewing’s sarcoma are very serious diseases mainly affecting children and teenagers. General radiologists are not likely to see these patients every day at their practice, but when they do, they must know what they have to do to optimise patient care and improve outcomes. Experts will give instructions and share useful advice during the dedicated Multidisciplinary Session today at the ECR.

Conventional x-ray of a tumour in the knee (Image provided by Prof. Koenraad Verstraete)

Conventional x-ray of a tumour in the knee
(Image provided by Prof. Koenraad Verstraete)

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Imaging plays major role in fight against head and neck cancers

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Watch this session on ECR Live: Monday, March 11, 08:30–10:00, Room N/O
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Organ-sparing surgery and radiation treatment such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) – often combined with chemotherapy – have increased the need for advanced imaging in the head and neck during pre-treament and post-treatment stages. Precision is vital as any tumour that remains undetected outside the treatment field could adversely affect the patients’ prognosis and survival, according to Professor Vincent Vandecaveye, from the department of radiology at the University Hospitals Leuven in Belgium.

It is important to spot any tumour recurrence as early as possible, especially in the post-treatment phase, in order give the patient the best possible chance of salvage treatment. The most common imaging methods in the head and neck area remain CT, MRI and PET-CT; each comes with its own advantages and disadvantages.

Multiparametric MRI for early treatment prediction of chemoradiation in oropharyngeal cancer:  Upper row is pre-treatment MRI of right base of tongue cancer (a=contrast enhanced T1 as anatomical correlate; b=native b1000 diffusion-weighted image; c= ADC-map; d=perfusion-map of IUAC). Middle row is 2 weeks during chemoradiation: same imaging sets, tumour volume will not help. No significant change in b1000, ADC nor perfusion-MRI indicate non-response and thus high risk of tumour relapse after end of treatment.  Tumour relapse at PET-CT 8 months after end of treatment, proven by histology (k). (Provided by Professor Vincent Vandecaveye)

Multiparametric MRI for early treatment prediction of chemoradiation in oropharyngeal cancer: Upper row is pre-treatment MRI of right base of tongue cancer (a=contrast enhanced T1 as anatomical correlate; b=native b1000 diffusion-weighted image; c= ADC-map; d=perfusion-map of IUAC). Middle row is 2 weeks during chemoradiation: same imaging sets, tumour volume will not help. No significant change in b1000, ADC nor perfusion-MRI indicate non-response and thus high risk of tumour relapse after end of treatment. Tumour relapse at PET-CT 8 months after end of treatment, proven by histology (k). (Provided by Professor Vincent Vandecaveye)

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10
Mar 2013
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