Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 99 – A painless approach to interpretation (Chapter 6) – SOLVED!

diploma_casebook_case99

Dear Friends,

We’re moving on to a new chapter of the Painless Approach to Interpretation, and this week I’m showing the routine control radiographs of a 48-year-old woman, surgically treated for carcinoma of the breast ten years ago.
What do you see?

Check the image below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back for the answer on Friday.

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Caceres’ Corner Case 148 (Update: Solution)

esr_2016_blog-cacerescorner-148

Dear Friends,

Today we are presenting a pre-op chest radiograph of a 70-year-old man with carcinoma of the bladder.
What do you see?

Check the image below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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21
Nov 2016
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DISCUSSION 21 Comments

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 98 – A painless approach to interpretation (Chapter 5) – SOLVED!

diploma_casebook_case98

Dear Friends,

Today we are moving to a new chapter in the Painless Approach to Interpretation, addressing what to do when the chest radiograph does not show an obvious abnormality.

For this purpose I am presenting the PA and lateral radiographs of a 57-year-old man with a chronic cough. What do you see?

Examine the image below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Caceres’ Corner Case 147 (Update: Solution)

esr_2016_blog-cacerescorner-147

Dear Friends,

Today we are showing a case in recognition of the International Day of Radiology, which takes place tomorrow.

Below are images of a 35-year-old woman with chest pain and progressive dyspnoea for the last three weeks. Leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

Most likely diagnosis:

1. Lymphoma
2. Pleural metastases
3. Mesothelioma
4. Any of the above

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07
Nov 2016
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DISCUSSION 18 Comments

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 97 – A painless approach to interpretation (Chapter 4) – SOLVED!

diploma_casebook_case97-bobk

Dear Friends,

Now that we’ve looked at the three key questions to ask when facing a chest radiograph (chapters 1, 2 and 3), we move on to the interpretation of pulmonary lesions.

Today I am showing chest radiographs of a 31-year-old woman with marked dyspnoea for the last three days.

What would you call the predominant pattern?

1. Reticulonodular
2. Septal
3. Air-space disease
4. None of the above

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Caceres’ Corner Case 146 (Update: Solution)

esr_2016_blog-cacerescorner-146

Dear Friends,

Today we’re showing chest radiographs of a 57-year-old man with chest pain and dyspnoea.

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments, and come back on Friday for the answer.

Diagnosis:

1. Carcinoma of the lung
2. Thymoma
3. Lymphoma
4. None of the above

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24
Oct 2016
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DISCUSSION 16 Comments

Caceres’ Corner Case 145 (Update: Solution)

esr_2016_blog-cacerescorner-145

Dear Friends,

Today we are presenting a recent case. The PA radiograph was made for routine check up of a 49-year-old male.

Check the image below, leave your thoughts in the comments and come back on Friday for the answer.

Diagnosis:

1. McLeod syndrome
2. Changes post-TB
3. Congenital lung hypoplasia
4. None of the above

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17
Oct 2016
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DISCUSSION 12 Comments

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 96 – A painless approach to interpretation (Chapter 3) – SOLVED!

diploma_casebook_case96

Dear Friends,

I hope you remember the three questions to ask when facing a chest radiograph:

a) Is there any visible abnormality? (Chapter 1)
b) Is it intra or extrapulmonary? (Chapter 2)
c) What does it look like?

To discuss the third question, I’m showing chest radiographs of a 36-year-old woman with chest pain.

What does the lesion look like?

1. Pericardial fat pad
2. Thymic tumour
3. Pericardial cyst
4. Any of the above

Check the two images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the solution.

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Caceres’ Corner Case 144 (Update: Solution)

esr_2016_blog-cacerescorner-144

Dear Friends,

Today we are showing another pre-op case, including a PA chest radiograph of a 62-year-old man with lumbar hernia. Check the image below, give us your thoughts in the comments, and come back on Friday for the answer.

Diagnosis:

1. TB
2. Carcinoma
3. Pulmonary hypertension
4. None of the above

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03
Oct 2016
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DISCUSSION 16 Comments

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 95 – A painless approach to interpretation (Chapter 2) – SOLVED!

diploma_casebook_case95

Dear Friends,

As you may remember from Diploma Case 94, when I’m facing a chest radiograph I start by asking three questions:

a) Is there any visible abnormality?
b) It is intra- or extrapulmonary?
c) What does it look like?

Today we will discuss the second question, showing chest radiographs in two different patients. Is the abnormality intra- or extrapulmonary? Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments and come back for the answer and discussion on Friday.

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