Trojanowska to deliver honorary lecture on neglected form of cancer

Polish radiologist Dr. Agnieszka Trojanowska will shed light on human papilloma virus (HPV)-induced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, a common yet long neglected type of cancer. In an interview with ECR Today, she also explained the origins of her passion for head and neck imaging, and how radiologists will increasingly benefit from computer science.

Dr. Agnieszka Trojanowska, assistant professor in the department of radiology and nuclear medicine at Lublin University Hospital, is an internationally recognised specialist in head and neck imaging. Her special interest for oncology and her natural curiosity led her to agree to deliver the Josef Lissner Honorary Lecture on HPV-induced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (HNSCC) at ECR 2018.

Agnieszka Trojanowska from Lublin, Poland, will speak on HPV-induced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck in her Honorary Lecture today.

“HNSCC behaves differently than more well-known forms of SCC, and it is becoming more and more prevalent. It affects young, well-educated people with high socioeconomic status, and is a quickly rising sexually transmitted entity with peculiar clinical and molecular characteristics. In particular the rise of HPV-induced cancer has been observed in the United States since the beginning of 21st century,” she said.

It was important for her to talk about this long overlooked topic, for which much remains to be done. “It has been under-estimated for many years in many countries. Nowadays, we can speak about an HPV epidemic, leading to a significant rise of oropharyngeal cancer incidences worldwide. These cancers are quite unique and, in my opinion, knowledge of their physiology and treatment options is essential,” she said.

New research shows that, compared with environmental-related head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, patients with HPV-related malignancies display a better response to treatment and a lower risk of death and progression, Dr. Trojanowska pointed out. It is also noteworthy that, according to the 2017 TNM classification, HPV+ cancers are evaluated with a separate grading scale, she added.

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Riklund to unveil the next big thing in hybrid imaging

The Swedish radiologist Prof. Katrine Riklund, the current Chair of the ESR Board of Directors, has dedicated her career to the development of hybrid imaging. During todays’ Marie Curie Honorary Lecture (Room A, 1:00 p.m.) she will look back at the achievements made in this emerging field and look forward to future advances.

Riklund, who is a professor, consultant in diagnostic radiology and pro-vice-chancellor of Umeå University, is one of Sweden’s leading radiologists. She is also one of the first researchers to have recognised the potential of combining PET with CT and MRI, and has worked to advance the field ever since its emergence at the beginning of the 21st century.

“The combination of structural and functional/molecular imaging is fascinating. The entire field is new and extremely interesting, and it’s the closest to my heart when it comes to imaging,” she said.

Prof. Katrine Riklund from Umeå, Sweden, will speak about the growing significance of hybrid imaging in today’s honorary lecture.

During her lecture, Prof. Riklund will share examples of what hybrid imaging can do and what is going to come next. A major trend will be making use of the entire hybrid imaging examination for diagnostic protocols, also for the CT part, she believes. “This changes workflow and gives us more information. PET and CT or MR are not competing techniques, they are complementary,” she said.

Tracer development is key for PET but digital detectors will also represent a major step forward. Currently, the need for a cyclotron for production of radionuclides hinders substantial distribution of scanners outside large centres. “To make hybrid imaging really take off, we need other forms of tracer production. I would like to see the tracer production work like a coffee machine – with buttons to select tracer and radionuclide,” she said.

In her day-to-day work, Prof. Riklund is involved in various research projects, such as COBRA, a prospective multimodal imaging study of dopamine, brain structure and function, and cognition; (PEARL-PD), 18F-FE-PE2I PET/CT, a study of dopamine transporters in early Parkinson’s disease, RECTOPET (REctal Cancer Trial On PET-MR/CT); and Prostate Cancer – PSMA and Acetate in PET/CT and PET/MR. These projects reflect her three major interests in the field; movement disorders and cognition in central nervous system, and prostate and colorectal cancer.

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The future is now, Marc Dewey says

The radiological community must understand the potential of value-based radiology and its related challenges, the German radiologist Marc Dewey will argue during the Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen honorary lecture today at ECR 2018.

Marc Dewey is Heisenberg Professor of Radiology of the German Research Foundation and Vice Chair of the Department of Radiology at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin. His main research interest is in cardiovascular imaging but he is interested in many other aspects of clinical practice including value-based imaging, something he will detail in his lecture at the ECR.

Prof. Marc Dewey from Berlin will deliver today’s Honorary Lecture on value-based imaging at 12:15 in Room A.

“Participants will get to know three things. First, why the time for value-based radiology is now. Second, they will appreciate the potential of value-based radiology in the clinical care process. And third, understand the challenges in implementing value-based radiology,” Dewey promised.

Combining human image analysis and artificial intelligence has great potential for creating value for patients at lower costs, he believes. “This is value-based radiology and the time to get involved is now, as this is not merely a new technical toy of radiologists but will be accompanying the entire diagnostic and treatment pathway in all clinical service lines for the benefit of our patients,” he said.

Dewey is the coordinator of the DISCHARGE trial, an EU-funded multicentre project with more than 30 partners across Europe that will determine whether cardiac CT may replace invasive coronary angiography in certain patients. “The DISCHARGE project is a unique and truly impressive effort of several hundred individuals working at 31 sites in 18 European countries. External advisory board members were often thrilled when first witnessing the team spirit at our annual meetings,” said Dewey, who will soon present results of the on-going clinical trial. He said coordinating a large project on imaging in Europe gave him “the ability to better understand the culture, concerns, and ideas in different regions of Europe.”

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Highly-respected Dutch researcher delivers honorary lecture on cardiac imaging


In recognition of his significant research and work in the areas of MRI, CT and cardiovascular imaging, Professor Albert de Roos from Leiden, the Netherlands, was invited to deliver the Josef Lissner Honorary Lecture entitled, ‘Research in cardiac imaging: how I do it’.

Prof. Albert de Roos from Leiden, the Netherlands.

Prof. Albert de Roos from Leiden, the Netherlands.

Albert de Roos is professor of radiology at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands. Originally from Ermelo, the Netherlands, Prof. de Roos received his medical degree (Cum Laude) from the University of Amsterdam in 1980 and then completed his residency in internal medicine at Zeeweg Hospital Velsen. He then went on to carry out a residency in radiology at St. Elisabeth Gasthuis Haarlem and University Hospital Leiden. In 1985, he was awarded a PhD for his thesis on ‘Biphasic Colon Examination’.

In 1988, Prof. de Roos travelled to the United States to become assistant professor of radiology at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He returned to the Netherlands to become associate professor of radiology at Leiden University Medical Center, where he has held a number of posts, including director of magnetic resonance imaging and director of computed tomography. He also served as co-leader of the Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands’ ‘Cardiovascular MRI’ project.

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