Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 110 – The Wisdom of Dr. Pepe (Chapter 3) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

To continue with the third chapter of The Wisdom of Dr. Pepe, I am​ showing radiographs of an asymptomatic 52-year-old man with previous history of asbestos exposure.

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

Diagnosis:
1. Fibrous tumour of pleura
2. Large pleural plaque
3. Pleural fat
4. Any of the above

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Caceres’ Corner Case 160 (Update: Solution)

Dear Friends,

Today I am showing a case from my good friend Jordi Andreu. Radiographs belong to a 52-year-old man with chest pain.
What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

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15
May 2017
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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 109 – The Wisdom of Dr. Pepe (Chapter 2) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

To continue with the second chapter of The wisdom of Dr. Pepe, I am​ showing radiographs of a 75-year-old man with cough and haemoptysis.
What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Caceres’ Corner Case 159 (Update: Solution)

Dear Friends,

Today we are presenting radiographs and CT images of a 35-year-old male tourist from Venezuela, who came to the ER with pain in the right hemithorax for the last five days. No fever.

As usual, check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

Diagnosis:

1. Mesothelioma
2. TB
3. Metastases
4. Any of the above

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01
May 2017
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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 108 – The Wisdom of Dr. Pepe (Chapter 1) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today we’ll start the third part of The Beauty of Basic Knowledge series, entitled The Wisdom of Dr. Pepe, in which I intend to summarise my basic approach to chest interpretation. Here I am showing radiographs of a 27-year-old man with moderate cough.

As usual, check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday to find out the solution.

Diagnosis:

1. RML disease
2. Pleural effusion
3. RLL mass
4. None of the above

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Caceres’ Corner Case 158 (Update: Solution)

Dear Friends,

Today I am showing chest radiographs of a 47-year-old man with fever and moderate dyspnoea. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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17
Apr 2017
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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 107 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 6) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

To conclude the section “To err is human” I am presenting PA radiographs of a 57-year-old hairdresser with interstitial lung disease, who is on the waiting list for lung transplant. What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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Caceres’ Corner Case 157 (Update: Solution)

Dear Friends,

Spring is here and it makes us want to present easy cases. Today we are showing preoperative radiographs for ankle trauma in a 47-year-old woman.
What do you see?

Check the images below, leave your thoughts in the comments section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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03
Apr 2017
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Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook: Case 106 – To err is human: how to avoid slipping up (Chapter 5) – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

This week I’m continuing with another chapter of “To err is human”; and today I am presenting chest radiographs of a 64-year-old man. These images were taken one month after a myocardial infarction.

Check the images carefully, leave your thoughts in the comments and come back on Friday for the answer.

Diagnosis:
1. Aortic elongation
2. Aortic dissection
3. Aortic aneurysm
4. Any of the above

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Caceres’ Corner Case 156 (Update: Solution)

Dear Friends,

Today we are presenting a routine control radiograph of a 31-year-old woman. Can you guess the reason for the operation?

Check the image below, leave your thoughts in the comments section, and come back on Friday for the answer.

1. Aortic coarctation
2. Aortic dissection
3. Congenital aortic valvular stenosis
4. None of the above

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20
Mar 2017
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DISCUSSION 8 Comments